Lovely 1920s Spanish-style duplex in Leimert Park asking $939K

By Pauline O’Connor

New on the market in Leimert Park is a well-preserved Spanish-style duplex that’s been around since 1928. The turreted building was one of a number of duplexes built in the neighborhood by local contractor Leo B. Elliott, and according to city records, shortly after its completion, the LA County Assessor determined its overall construction quality to be “special”—the highest category possible.

Located at 2900 West 43rd Place, a few blocks east of Leimert Park Village, the 2,796-square-foot duplex’s vacant lower unit has two bedrooms, two bathrooms, a step-down living room, kitchen, formal dining room, and an office. Along with a new kitchen and new plumbing and electrical systems, it’s got a bounty of lovely original features, including restored hardwood floors, an arched window with stained glass panel, coved ceilings, plaster archways, French doors, built-ins, and colorful ceramic tile.

To read the full article visit their website here.

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DPP Curate Helps Boost Mid-Century Sale

dpp curate | Before and After photos of the living room

Built in 1964 as part of The Cliffs, a modernist development in the Montecito Heights neighborhood of Los Angeles, 3877 Latrobe Street stands as a stunning example of mid-century modern architecture. The home was designed by architect John Lawrence Pugsley, who is best known for his mid-century commissions in neighboring Pasadena. After a series of renovations, including an appearance on HGTV’s Room Crashers, the dream home was finally realized. The home now feels open and bright thanks to multiple skylights, windows, and doors of sliding glass. The proud owners chose Deasy Penner Podley’s own Carrie Bryden to represent the sale of this special property. Originally listed at $789,000, the home sold for $930,000 after only fifteen days on the market.

The success of the 3877 Latrobe sale is attributable to a staging transformation organized by the DPP Curate program. DPP Curate is Deasy Penner Podley’s new premier concierge platform. Working with Southern California’s most trusted renovations and staging vendors, the service is available to home sellers via their DPP listing agent. The Curate program manages everything from painting, landscaping, staging, moving, roof repairs, light remodeling to whatever is necessary to get the listing ready for top dollar quickly. And all that for no cash out of pocket!

The staging done for Latrobe is an example of how DPP Curate can help a home sell for top dollar. Professional staged homes sell for an average of 3% more than non-staged homes. Latrobe sold for $141,000 over list price; that’s a significant amount at 18% over asking.

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$2.3 Million Homes in California, North Carolina and Massachusetts

By Julie Lasky

James Allen Walter, a California architect, designed this house for Geoffrey and Doreen Siodmak, a couple who moved in when South Pasadena was “just goats grazing and some avocado trees growing,” as Ms. Siodmak later described it to a historian. The home is being sold by its second owners, following a respectful renovation that involved new insulation, plumbing and electrical systems, windows and doors, and an updated kitchen and bathrooms. The home is at the end of a cul-de-sac, about 10 miles northeast of downtown Los Angeles.

Size: 2,252 square feet

Price per square foot: $999

Indoors: Orange double doors open to a forecourt, and glass-panel doors take you into the house. The U-shaped building’s two long wings are on either side of a large outdoor deck. The wings have vaulted ceilings with dark beams; newly laid cork floors; and glass walls facing the deck.

To read the full article visit their website here

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Modernism Week 2020

Koerner House, 1955 | E. Stewart Williams, Architect

While the wider world knows February to be the month of love, architects, designers, and fans of mid-century aesthetics know February can only mean one thing: Modernism Week. Once a year, the city of Palm Springs hosts visitors from all over Southern California and the world for a week of historic home tours, showroom sales, and cocktail parties that rival even the grooviest soirees of Palm Springs’ heyday.

Palm Springs’ legacy of mid-century modern architecture makes the area a living museum. Significant architecture doesn’t just belong to residential homes, commercial and civic buildings are also destinations that are easily accessible all year round. But for an insider’s look, Modernism Week is one of the only times that the public is invited into private homes.

What sets Palm Springs modernist homes apart from other residences of the movement is the unique adaptations architects had to make when designing homes for desert living. A specific set of aesthetics define “Desert Modernism” and these tastes remain popular today. Certain materials are favored by architects such as Neutra, Krisel, and Frey for their utilitarian properties and design. Instead of molding the landscape to the designs, architects worked with the natural beauty of the desert oasis to create their designs. One striking example is Albert Frey’s “Frey House II” where a boulder is used as a natural partition between living and entertaining quarters of home, resulting with very little disruption to the natural landscape. Use of concrete, steel, and expanses of glass are favored for their ability to handle harsh weather. Signature features of Desert Modernism include roof styles such as the butterfly roof and folded plate roof which mirror the San Jacinto mountain views signature to Palm Springs living, flat shed roof, post and beam interiors, and concrete breeze blocks to provide privacy and a cooling effect. The result is a sleek and effortless form that is breezy, simple and elegant.

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A Rare and Restored 1967 Post-and-Beam in South Pasadena Hits the Market for $2.25M

By Jennifer Baum Lagdameo

Designed by James Allen Walter, this timeless Mid-Century gem is one of only 32 homes in California by the coveted architect.

Set in a quiet cul-de-sac on a large, private lot with mountain views, 2050 La Fremontia Street, also known as the Siodmak House, was designed in 1967 by California Mid-Century architect James Allen Walter. One of only 32 homes in California designed by Walter, the 2,252-square-foot post-and-beam structure features a sleek, dark-wood facade highlighted by a pair of bright orange front doors.

The four-bedroom, two-bath, U-shaped home is actually composed of two rectangular volumes, connected by the front doors, which open into a serene interior courtyard garden. From there, the home gradually unfolds into an inward-facing, open-plan layout centered around an elongated courtyard. The design encourages indoor/outdoor living, while walls of glass, clerestory windows and skylights fill every corner with natural light.

To read the full article visit their website here.

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