Clad in Black, This Minimalist, Japanese-Inspired Home Asks $1.7M

By Jennifer Baum Lagdameo

This monochromatic home in Southern California stands out for so many reasons.

Clad in corrugated cement fiberboard with sleek black exteriors, the Monokuro House cuts a striking figure. Set in a suburban neighborhood in Torrence, California, surrounded traditional single-story residences, the home stands out due to its distinctive facade and its minimalist design.

Los Angeles–based W3 Architects designed the Monokuro House for a Japanese family looking for “an extremely simple modern house that would express the clear dark/light contrast found in traditional Japanese architecture.” (Monokuro is Japanese for “monochrome.”)

The thoughtfully engineered 2,550-square-foot home is designed for indoor/outdoor living. The open-plan layout places all of the public spaces on the lower level, while the bedrooms are located on the top floor. The design also makes great use of sustainable materials and employs passive building strategies such as cross ventilation, high thermal mass, setback windows, and operable skylights.

To read the full article visit their website here.

You Might Also Like...
Recent Posts

Snazzy post and beam in Pasadena asking $1.4M

By Pauline O’Connor Stirring up the market in Pasadena this week is a classic post and beam that’s had the same owner since being built in 1959. Located at 300 Anita Drive in the San Rafael Hills, the two-story residence is described as “a nod to Buff and Hensman” in its listing copy, quite justifiably…. Keep reading

Gorgeous Mid-Century In Pasadena, $1.375M

By Philip Ferrato A real estate unicorn, this 1959 Post+Beam has been put on the market by the estate of its original owners in original but beautifully maintained condition. And while no architect has been identified, this house is very much of its time, and in a way that’s rarely seen today. If we had… Keep reading

The Romance Of Concrete And Steel In Laurel Canyon, $1.875M

By Philip Ferrato Since the 1950s, Laurel Canyon has been a neighborhood of innovative architecture, and this new project by the architecture firm Mutuo joins that long tradition. Tasked by the developer to create three homes on a steep downslope, the firm placed the homes dramatically against a 20-foot-high retaining wall, creating room for deeply shaded… Keep reading