Landmarked midcentury post and beam in Glendale asks $1.5M

By Elijah Chiland

This lovely Glendale residence is stylish enough that the city added it to its historic register as an “outstanding example of post and beam modern-style architecture.”

Built in 1963, the home sits on an 8,195-square-foot lot at the northeastern edge of the city, close to the Chevy Chase Country Club. It’s got four bedrooms and three bathrooms, with 2,103 square feet of living space.

Interior features include beamed and vaulted ceilings, walls of glass, hardwood floors, and small windows cut into a niche in the ceiling that create a luminous skylight effect. Sliding doors lead from the open living room out to a wraparound deck with nice treetop views. The dining area is equipped with built-in cabinetry and the kitchen has been updated with stainless steel appliances.

To read the full article visit their website here.

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