The Brady Bunch

By Kelsey Kloss

The actress, who starred in the sitcom as Jan Brady, has owned the home for nearly 50 years.

When the world first became acquainted with Eve Plumb, she was starring in the 70s sitcom “The Brady Bunch” as Jan Brady, and saying a whole lot of “Marcia, Marcia, Marcia.” Turns out, as an 11-year-old, she was also buying beachfront property in Malibu with the help of her parents, according to the Los Angeles Times.

The Los Angeles Times reports that young Eve Plumb paid $55,300 for the 850-square-foot property, which is situated on the south end of Escondido Beach, in 1969. She recently sold it for $3.9 million.

The architecture firm MEIS (whose founder led the design of the Los Angeles’ Staples Center) has plans to turn the 50s bungalow, which has three bedrooms and 1.75 bathrooms, into a modern 3,500-square-foot home with 2.5 bathrooms, a retractable moon roof, floor-to-ceiling glass and a stacked-car garage, according to Daily Mail.

To read the full article visit their website here.

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