A 1930’s Cottage That Was a Costume Designer’s Muse

By Taylor Murphy

Bonnie and Clyde, The Godfather II, and Myra Breckinridge — all three of these films share a stylish common denominator: Theadora Van Runkle, the costume designer who brought the wardrobes of each picture to life.

And tucked away in Laurel Canyon, California is her own real-life translation of her craft. Hidden at the end of a long driveway is a 1930’s cottage, sitting atop nearly half an acre. This home belonged to Van Runkle, and served as her private haven, studio and source of inspiration.

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“I’d never designed anything before,” Van Runkle told the Los Angeles Times, in reference to her work on Bonnie and Clyde. “But I knew fashion. I knew style. I knew construction.” And her home is certainly further proof of that.

The majority of the cottage is dressed in shabby-chic white (with the exposed beams and other wood details to match). The neutral hue acts as a canvas for some magnificent pops of color — art, ceramics, rugs, and other antiques offer an unexpected element at every turn.

Van Runkle died in 2011, and the cottage is now on the market. But can you really put a price on home that served as an artist’s muse? You can — and it’s a cool $1.8 million.

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