Astonishing Pasadena Post + Beam, $2.125M

by Philip Ferrato

Immaculately restored and cared for, this superb Post + Beam from 1957 by Buff, Straub + Hensman, known as the Thomson House, is not only one of the finest examples of the firm’s work in wood, but one of the best Post + Beam houses to survive from the period.

Buff, Straub + Hensman was among the pioneering postwar Southern California architectural firms, and here, brought their brand of woodsy Modernism to a site previously believed to be unbuildable. Founded in 1950 by Conrad Buff and Donald Hensman, the firm designed hundreds of California dream homes, ranging over five decades from the early Post + Beam to a later evolution of sophisticated residential Brutalism.

This 4-bed, 3-bath classic hovers at the edge of a canyon, set just below the street, giving it an unparalleled sense of seclusion. Even the carport is a Post + Beam composition, setting the stage for what’s to come down a few steps.

To read the full article visit their website here.

 

You Might Also Like...
Recent Posts

Stay Positive and Keep Moving Forward

By John Voket Regions served: Palm Springs and Los Angeles Years the real estate: 21 Number of offices: 9 Number of agents: 300 Best tip for getting the right listing price: Never “buy” a listing by telling a seller what they want to hear. Price the home accurately and know that your expertise will serve… Keep reading

Christian ‘Bloodshy’ Karlsson Falls for a Mid-Century Home in Pasadena

By Jack Flemming It didn’t take long for this Mid-century gem to dazzle a buyer. The Pasadena home recently sold to Grammy-winning DJ Christian Karlsson for $2.385 million after roughly two weeks on the market. Karlsson, who performs as Bloodshy in the prolific production duo Bloodshy & Avant, must’ve liked what he saw. Records show… Keep reading

A Japanese-Inspired Post & Beam by Ray Kappe Lists in Los Angeles

By Claire Carponen SCI-Arc founder Ray Kappe brings together post-and-beam construction and Japanese modernism in this Los Angeles property, which has a curved, glass-elevated roof. Kappe designed the hilltop Sherman Oaks home in 1961 and then rebuilt it in 1996 in its original style after it was destroyed in the 1994 Northridge earthquake. The two-bedroom Meyer Residence… Keep reading