‘Godfather’ production designer Dean Tavoularis parts with longtime setting in Hancock Park

By Neal J. Leitereg

The longtime Hancock Park home of Dean Tavoularis, the Oscar-winning production designer of “The Godfather” trilogy, and his wife, French actress Aurore Clément, has sold for $1.995 million.

Owned by Tavoularis and Clément for decades, the two-story home is a stellar example of the Spanish Colonial Revival style. A courtyard with a colorfully tiled fountain sits just beyond the gates of the 1933-built home. Terracotta shingles, arched doorways and stained glass windows reinforce the classic architecture.

Inside, some 3,500 square feet of living space includes a vaulted-ceiling living room, a dining room, five bedrooms and five bathrooms. Vintage tilework draws the eyes in the kitchen and bathrooms. The breakfast nook is a throwback with built-in booth seating and a folding table.

Tavoularis, 88, is known for his collaborations with filmmaker Francis Ford Coppola, including “The Godfather” films as well as the Vietnam War epic “Apocalypse Now” (1979). Nominated for five Academy Awards, he won the Oscar for art direction for “The Godfather Part II.”

His other credits include Arthur Penn’s 1967 classic “Bonnie and Clyde,” Coppola’s “One From the Heart” (1981) and Warren Beatty’s “Bulworth.”

Clément, 74, has appeared in scores of French and U.S. films including “Apocalypse Now Redux,” the 2001 extended cut of Coppola’s movie, and “Paris, Texas” (1984), which won the Palme d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival in 1984.

Matthew Berkley and Scott Lander of Deasy Penner Podley held the listing.

To read the full article visit their website here.

You Might Also Like...
Recent Posts

Most Common Listing Photo Mistakes and How to Fix Them

By Mike Cahill Preparing your home to be put on the market takes a lot of work. From pre-listing inspections to staging, to appraising it is very easy to get overwhelmed by the whole process. But if there’s one thing that you shouldn’t underestimate it’s the power of a strong online listing presence. Having an… Keep reading

The Thompson Moseley House | Quintessential 1959 Buff, Straub & Hensman Post And Beam

Gently sited on more than half an acre on a slight knoll, The Thompson Moseley House, built in 1959 – represents the pivotal and seminal early pitched roof “post and beam” work by Buff, Straub & Hensman. Exceptional restoration, true to its original design and modernized by Space Int’l, it capitalizes on today’s desired style… Keep reading

1885 New England Colonial Revival

This exquisite home built in the late 1800s is an excellent example of the New England Colonial Revival-style of architecture in Southern California. Its character defining features borrowed from Colonial New England include a steep gable roof, symmetrical window placement, a prominent porch with classical columns across the front facade, narrow clapboard wood siding, and… Keep reading