Preservation Personals: A Modernist Castle Above Los Angeles

By Emma Sarappo

If you’re searching for an older home with plenty of history, I might not initially stand out. After all, I was built in 1957, which is quite young in a dense field of 18th- and 19th-century architecture. But when you step back and take a real look at me, my clean lines and welcoming corners will blow you away. I’m an example of the best of Southern California’s Midcentury Modern architecture, and I happen to be one of the largest homes my architect, Richard Neutra, built in North America. Now I’m looking for someone new to fill my over 5,000 square feet of space.

If you know about Modernism, you understand that its global impact on art and architecture is immense, even though it’s a more recent movement than other famous and influential styles.

To read the full article visit their website here.

You Might Also Like...
Recent Posts

Frank Llloyd Wright’s Freeman House

Completed in 1925, Frank Lloyd Wright’s Freeman House is widely considered of his most important designs. It’s situated in the Hollywood Hills with sweeping views of the Los Angeles and the LA Basin and is constructed from 12,000 textured concrete blocks. The textile design is exposed on both the exterior and the interior and is… Keep reading

Freeman House, The House Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in the Early 1920s, Is For Sale

By Mary Elizabeth Andriotis A house designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in Los Angeles is on the market for 4.25 million dollars (about 3.58 million euros), and its seller is none other than the University of Southern California, which acquired the property. in 1986 after the original owners donated it to the USC School of… Keep reading

On Preservation: Well-Heeled Hero Wanted to Free Wright’s Tarnished Treasure

By Brian Curran When Harriett Freeman deeded her home in the Hollywood Hills to the University of Southern California in 1984, she must have thought that she had taken an action to ensure its preservation and protection. Built in 1924, the rare architectural treasure was designed for Samuel and Harriett Freeman by none other than… Keep reading