Sam Maloof contributed woodwork to this $5 million Pasadena neo-Craftsman

Photography © Carothers Photo

A neo-Craftsman-style house that master woodworker Sam Maloof contributed beam work, fireplace mantels and window casings has hit the market in Pasadena.

The asking price is $4.995 million.

Dubbed the “Landmark House,” it was designed by Arts and Crafts revivalist Lee Hershberger for noted engineering firm owner Joseph J. Jacobs to fit in with the surrounding Craftsman architecture. The house has five bedrooms, six bathrooms and 5,534 square feet of living space with walls of glass, 18-foot cathedral ceilings and teak parquet flooring.

Other features include a tiled fireplace, walk-up wet bar and built-ins — think a dining room’s marble-top buffet, window seats and a wall of bookcases in the library, and cedar closets in the bedrooms.


To read the full article visit their website here.

 

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