1885 New England Colonial Revival

This exquisite home built in the late 1800s is an excellent example of the New England Colonial Revival-style of architecture in Southern California. Its character defining features borrowed from Colonial New England include a steep gable roof, symmetrical window placement, a prominent porch with classical columns across the front facade, narrow clapboard wood siding, and double hung windows.

Other Colonial features include a distinctive curved wall on the south elevation, a decorative multi-pane window in the entry hall, coffered ceiling in the dining room, and robust molded window and door trim throughout the interior. The current owners, an architect and engineer by trade have meticulously restored this light filled home over the years.

To read the full article visit their website here.

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